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Books to Read on Weepy Sappy Days

     Most people have sappy days.  Most of my friends will tell me that they have days when all they want to do is switch on Netflix and find a movie that makes them cry.  But, you know, sometimes the Internets are not working or all that blue light is making your eyes bleed.  To remedy such crises, I have created this list as an alternative for people who would like to read a book that will make them cry.  Some of them are romantic-sad, some of them are tragic-sad, some of them are beautiful-sad. And I guarantee that all of them are good as well as tear-jerking.  

My cat is having One Of Those Days
1. Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell - Whoa, whoa, wait.  Is this really a YA romance in which the girl isn't gorgeous and flawless???  Yes.  Yes it is.  You're welcome.
2. The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane by Kate Di Camillo - An arrogant porcelain rabbit doll is lost by a little girl and learns what love is by losing love, over and over again. This is the only book I ever seriously cried over.  
3. The Book Thief by Markus Zusak - I can't even tell you the most horrific part of this book.  I'll just say that basically, it's about a German girl who rescues books from Nazi book-burnings during the Holocaust. 
4. The Fault in Our Stars by John Green - I mean, durr :P 
5. Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson - A girl moves into a small town, beats all the boys in a race at recess, and creates an imaginary world for herself and a friend to inhabit in the woods. Sounds inoffensive enough, but it ends in rivers of tears.
6. The Boy in the Striped Pajamas by John Boyne - It looks like a children's book but this is NOT A CHILDREN'S BOOK!  It's about the Holocaust and friendship.  The last line will stay with you forever.
7. Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt - Read if you want to know the heartbreaking consequences of drinking from a Fountain of Youth.  
8. The Harry Potter books - They will leave you feeling like everyone you've ever loved is dead. 
9. Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell - Grace would want this book to be here; she read all 1,037 pages of it in the fourth grade and still demands that her friends read it.
10. Every Day by David Levithan - A spirit-creature-thing who never spends more than a day in the same body falls in love with a human girl.  Is a happy ending even possible here?

     - Carly

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