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Websites Built for Bibliophiles


     So I love to read, but I am also a child of the Digital Age, so I spent a fair amount of time screwing around on the Internet.  As a result, I frequent a lot of book-centric websites.  Here are a few of my favorites!

1. http://www.whatshouldireadnext.com/
I can't tell you how helpful this little search engine is.  Just type in the name of a book you like and it will pull up a list of related recommendations.
2. http://www.hatrack.com/
This is Orson Scott Card's blog.  Through it, he imparts his writer-ly wisdom.  You all know how much I love Card, so you can probably guess what I think of this site.
3. http://www.theparisreview.org/blog/
The magazine is famous, but who has the money to subscribe?  I like rummaging through the site's archives, reading essays and stories from old issues.
4. http://www.sparknotes.com/
Before you tear me to pieces, allow me to explain.  I'm not suggesting that y'all read Sparknotes instead of actual books.  I would never condone such treachery!  I've found that the Sparknotes website is actually a hub of nerd activity (as I write this, "This week's Sherlock Geek Quiz is anything but elementary" and "Welcome to the jelly-filled heart of Panem!" are among the most popular posts).  
Now that I think about it, though, it makes complete sense that Sparknotes would be full of nerds.
5. https://instagram.com/hotdudesreading/
I shake with laughter every time I scroll through this account.  CHECK IT OUT.

     - Carly

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