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Book Gift-Giving Guide

     Is this post relevant to this season?  No.  But do I care?  Again, no.
     Below you will find a list of personality types and books that might make good gifts for each.  I don't pretend to address all or even most of the personality types on Earth with this list, and I can't guarantee that the recipient of your gift will enjoy the books that I recommend, but hey, I'm trying.

NERD: This one's easy - wrap up a science fiction classic!  I suggest Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card, Ender's Shadow by Orson Scott Card, or The Ultimate Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams.  The His Dark Materials trilogy is great too, although it's more fantasy than science fiction.

That Person Who Loves Inspirational Quotes: A Chicken Soup for the Soul book is definitely a safe bet here.  

Traveler: 1000 Places to See Before You Die by Patricia Schultz is perfect for someone who is constantly planning their gap year or retirement trip around the world.  

That Person Who Likes to Cry: The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane by Kate DiCamillo is about a toy rabbit who loses his child.  I know it sounds like a children's book, but it's too sad to be for kids! 

Athlete: If this is a kid, give him or her any one of those Mike Lupica books about teenagers and sports and perseverance.  For a slightly older audience, I prefer The Running Dream by Wendelin van Draanen.  The main character is a track star who loses a leg in a car accident.

That Person You Can't Stand: Give them the entirety of one of those endless series targeted at middle school girls that use brand names as adjectives.  

     - Carly

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